thousands of free and legal carefully curated MP3's

The High Fidelity



Glasgow, Scotland's Sean Dickson, former singer, songwriter, and guitarist of The Soup Dragons, disbanded his platinum-selling group in 1995. After the hit U.K. single "Mother Universe" on from the Dragons' second album Lovegod, and their 1992 U.S. hit "Divine Thing" from Hotwired, Sean was the group's only remaining original member. After the The Soup Dragons' demise, he stayed at home writing and recording music for himself until High Times magazine asked him to contribute a track to their pot-themed covers album Hempilation. For this task, he formed The High Fidelity and did an obscure song called "Smokin' Cheeba Cheeba." Having already put together the band, Sean soon began the journey to create The High Fidelity's debut album Demonstration.

The High Fidelity recorded Demonstration in Sean's bedroom over a span of two years. After recording most of the album, he found himself in India working with Chandru, one of India's premier conductors and composers. Chandru put together a 65-piece orchestra to complete six songs on the album, out of her respect for The High Fidelity. Sean notes that Indian orchestras often use 100-piece arrangements to cut through as a solo instrument, instead of the typical background layer. This concept was an unique attraction for the album.

The High Fidelity's eclectic pop mixes drum loops, electronics, and synths in rock-structured songs. On Demonstration, "Luv Dup" starts the album off with a drum sound and lead guitar right off of The Flaming Lips' Transmissions from the Satellite Heart and takes off from there, drawing from a number of influences like Girls Against Boys and Spiritualized, but taking them to through new and different pop corridors. The High Fidelity presently releases albums on Sean's own Plastique Recordings, sacrificing financial stability for creative freedom. They're released in the U.S. by the new label Freedom in Exile. They've already enjoyed success on college radio and received a considerable press response.

similar artists


related artists


labels


genres


scenes